Posted by & filed under Articles, Haryana, In the Press, India, Photos, Press Releases, Sulabh News.

दैनिक जागरण

Publish Date:Sun, 19 Nov 2017 05:42 PM (IST)

विश्व शौचायल दिवस पर कार्यक्रम आयोजित

विश्व शौचायल दिवस पर कार्यक्रम आयोजित

जागरण संवाददाता, नूंह: खंड के गांव मरोड़ा में सुलभ इंटरनेशनल संस्था द्वारा विश्व शौचालय दिवस को उत्साह के साथ मनाया गया। इस कार्यक्रम में क्षेत्र के लोगों ने बढ़-चढ़कर भाग लिया।

मौके पर सुलभ इंटरनेशनल संस्था के संस्थापक ¨बदेश्वर पाठक ने विश्व के सबसे बड़े शौचालय का भी उद्घाटन करते हुए बताया कि बीते कई माह में सुलभ संस्था मरोड़ा गांव में स्वच्छता को लेकर कार्य कर रही है।

अभी तक गांव के सभी घरों में निश्शुल्क शौचालयों का निर्माण कार्य किया गया है। इससे पूर्व भी संस्था ने खंड के गांव कौराली, धांधुका, हिरमथला व टपकन में स्वच्छता को बढ़ावा देने के लिए शौचालयों का निर्माण कार्य किया है। जिससे क्षेत्र में स्वच्छता के बढ़ावा के लिए मदद मिली है।

वह देश के साथ दुनिया के कई मुल्कों में स्वच्छता को बढ़ाने के लिए कार्य कर रहे हैं, जिससे उनको अब काफी बदलाव देखने को मिल रहे हैं। देश के पीएम नरेंद्र मोदी ने भी देश में स्वच्छता अभियान को बढ़ाने के लिए राष्ट्र स्तर पर अभियान चलाया है।

मौके पर पुनित आहलूवालिया यूएसए, प्रमाजेन रामया अफ्रीका, राष्ट्रीय सफाई कर्मचारी सफाई आयोग के सदस्य दिलीप के हथिबेड पटना व राजस्थान विश्वविद्यालय के कुलपति श्यामलाल, प्रोफेसर अमिताभ कूंडू दिल्ली, पूर्वमंत्री हसन मोहम्मद, मेवात विकास एजेंसी के चेयरमैन खुर्शीद राजाका, नरेंद्र पटेल, भाजपा के जिला उपाध्यक्ष सिबराम शर्मा, खलील अहमद एडवोकेट, सरपंच शौकत अली व जुहरुद्दीन सहित सैंकड़ों लोग मौजूद रहे।

By Jagran 
Source : http://www.jagran.com/haryana/mewat-world-toilet-day-17061365.html

Posted by & filed under Articles, Haryana, In the Press, India, Photos, Press Releases, Sulabh News.

The Asian Age

A mega pot of toilet made up of iron, fibre, wood and plaster of Paris was unveiled in the hamlet to mark the World Toilet Day.

PTI / Published : Nov 19, 2017
Sanitation expert and Sulabh International founder Bindeshwar Pathak and other dignitaries inaugurated the

Sanitation expert and Sulabh International founder Bindeshwar Pathak and other dignitaries inaugurated the “biggest toilet pot of the world” (Photo: AFP)

New Delhi: World’s biggest toilet pot model was unveiled at Marora, popularly known as the “Trump village”, in Haryana on the World Toilet Day today in a bid to create awareness towards sanitation and use of toilets.

The nondescript village, with a population of 1,800, in Mewat region was in June rechristened as “Trump village” by NGO Sulabh International Social Service Organisation in a gesture to US president Donald Trump ahead of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Washington.

The Nuh district administration, however, later said the move to rename the village was “illegal”, forcing the organisation members to remove boards mentioning the new name.

A mega pot of toilet made up of iron, fibre, wood and plaster of Paris – measuring 20×10 feet – was unveiled in the hamlet to mark the World Toilet Day, which is observed on November 19 to inspire action to tackle the global sanitation crisis.

Sanitation expert and Sulabh International founder Bindeshwar Pathak and other dignitaries inaugurated the “biggest toilet pot of the world” model and dedicated another 95 new household toilets to the residents of the village.

“It’s a symbolic gesture to inaugurate a large toilet pot at Trump village to mark the World Toilet Day to create awareness among people towards the use of toilets and safe sanitation,” Pathak said.

He said the large pot replica would be moved to Delhi’s Sulabh Toilet Museum.

Pathak had in June announced in Washington his decision to adopt Marora. He had said the move was aimed to encourage businessmen adopt villages in India to promote sanitation.

Since then, Sulabh International has carried out the construction of toilets for every household and set up of a vocational training centre for girls in the village.

“Organising a programme in a remote village of Haryana on the World Toilet Day was a promotional concept in connection with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s vision to make villages in India free from open defecation on the occasion of Mahatma Gandhi’s 150th birth anniversary year in 2019,” Pathak said.

“Trump’s slogan is ‘Make America Great Again’ and our Prime Minister’s credo is ‘Make in India’, so I thought why not make a humble beginning honouring the friendship of the two,” he said.

Apart from inaugurating individual toilets, two books on the use of toilets and sanitation were also released.

Pathak said he hoped the move would win enough attention and goodwill to raise awareness for a major social problem.

Puneet Ahulwalia, a member of the ruling Republican Party of the US, speaking on the occasion, said the initiative would go long way to motivate masses towards cleanliness and safe sanitation.

Source : http://www.asianage.com/newsmakers/191117/biggest-toilet-pot-model-unveiled-at-haryanas-trump-village.html

Posted by & filed under Articles, Haryana, In the Press, India, Press Releases, Sulabh News.

TNN | Nov 19, 2017, 07:03 IST

Mewat: The village of Marora in Mewat is all set to get 95 toilets on Sunday, which is celebrated as World Toilet Day. The toilets have been constructed by Sulabh International, a social service organisation. The new toilets require lesser water for flushing, and the waste will be converted into manure.

Out of the 120 houses in the village, only 25 had toilets. Now, Sunday will see the remaining 95 households in the village, as well as the government primary school, getting toilets.

Considering the water shortage in the village, the ‘Magic Toilets’ have been made with twin-pit technology, which doesn’t require a sewerage line and needs only one litre of water for flushing.

The excrement is collected in an underground pit, which will eventually be composted into manure after two years.

“Each Sulabh Magic Toilet will cost around Rs 40,000. It’ll help not only in keeping the village open-defecation free, but in socially uplifting the area too,” said Dr Bindeshwar Pathak, founder, Sulabh International.

Source : https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/gurgaon/trump-village-to-get-toilets/articleshow/61707255.cms

Posted by & filed under Articles, Delhi, In the Press, India, Photos, Press Releases, Sulabh News.

The Economic Times

Politics and Nation

Nov 19, 2017, 06.11 PM IST

The king's pottie
The king’s pottie
1/7

A throne with a built-in commode for a French monarch takes pride of place at a New Delhi museum trying to break taboos surrounding toilets in a country where such convenience remains a sensitive issue.

The replica of the wooden throne used by King Louis XIV is among a treasure trove at the Sulabh International Museum of Toilets, tucked away in a bustling suburb of the Indian capital.

The French king is believed to have struggled with constipation and held audiences while defecating to save time, say the museum curators.

One weird museum
One weird museum
2/7

Scores of curious visitors stop by daily to see the centuries-old commodes, chamber pots and bidets as well as a 21st century machine that turns human waste into ash in seconds. More were expected for Sunday’s UN World Toilet Day which has events around the globe.

“It is quite an unusual museum and I believe it’s the only one of its kind in the world,” Bindeshwar Pathak, founder of the museum and the non-profit Sulabh International, said.

“The idea was to start a healthy conversation about sanitation and toilets. We wanted to tell people toilet is not a dirty word,” he said, playing with a small black ball made from dried human waste mixed with glue.

Among world's top 10 whackeist museums
Among world’s top 10 whackeist museums
3/7

Pathak said the museum has gained traction since being named among the world’s top 10 whacky museums by Time magazine in 2014.

“Hundreds of visitors come now on the weekends,” said the 74-year-old, affectionately known as India’s ‘Toilet Guru’.

The walls of the museum are plastered with toilet room jokes as well as Victorian-era pictures of ‘basket women’ in Europe carrying night-soil — fertiliser made from human feces.

A touchy issue
A touchy issue
4/7

Toilets are a touchy issue in India where about 600 million people — nearly half of the population — defecate in the open, according to UNICEF.

Some 70 percent of Indian households do not have a toilet — while 90 percent have access to mobile phones. More than half the world population does not have a home toilet.

Breaking stereotypes
Breaking stereotypes
5/7

Experts say open defecation in India stems from poverty and a belief that toilets inside the home are unclean. So people prefer to squat in the open.

Three years ago, Prime Minister Narendra Modi launched a massive cleanliness drive, pledging to build toilets for all by 2019.

So far the government has helped install more than 50 million toilets across the country of 1.3 billion people.

Bathroom trivias
Bathroom trivias
6/7

The Delhi museum’s collection also draws the curious to see a cushioned loo used in European gambling clubs which helped members keep an eye on table stakes without having to take a break.

One 18th century pot used by French royalty mocks the English by being designed as a stack of Shakespearean classic books.

It's all good
It’s all good
7/7

An employee of Sulabh International Museum of Toilets explains a toilet compost system to nursing students in New Delhi.

Source : https://m.economictimes.com/news/politics-and-nation/museum-seeks-to-convince-indians-that-toilets-are-not-dirty/the-kings-pottie/amp_slideshow/61712841.cms

Posted by & filed under Articles, Delhi, In the Press, India, Photos, Press Releases, Sulabh News.

Logo

Scores of curious visitors stop by daily at the Sulabh International Museum of Toilets in the capital to see centuries-old commodes, chamber pots and bidets, as well as a 21st century machine that turns human waste into ash in seconds.

MORE LIFESTYLE Updated: Nov 19, 2017 12:54 IST

Agence France-Presse
Nursing students walk through the Sulabh International Museum of Toilets in New Delhi.

Nursing students walk through the Sulabh International Museum of Toilets in New Delhi. (AFP/Sajjad Hussain)

A throne with a built-in commode for a French monarch takes pride of place at a New Delhi museum trying to break taboos surrounding toilets in a country where such convenience remains a sensitive issue.

The replica of the wooden throne used by King Louis XIV is among a treasure trove at the Sulabh International Museum of Toilets, tucked away in a bustling suburb of the capital city.

The French king is believed to have struggled with constipation and held audiences while defecating to save time, say the museum curators.

Scores of curious visitors stop by daily to see the centuries-old commodes, chamber pots and bidets as well as a 21st century machine that turns human waste into ash in seconds. More are expected on November 19, which happens to be UN World Toilet Day.

“It is quite an unusual museum and I believe it’s the only one of its kind in the world,” Bindeshwar Pathak, founder of the museum and the non-profit Sulabh International, told AFP.

“The idea was to start a healthy conversation about sanitation and toilets. We wanted to tell people toilet is not a dirty word,” he said, playing with a small black ball made from dried human waste mixed with glue.

Sulabh International Museum of Toilets scientist R.C Jha displays a toilet that can incinerate waste. (AFP/Sajjad Hussain)

Pathak said the museum has gained traction since being named among the world’s top 10 whacky museums by Time magazine in 2014. “Hundreds of visitors come now on the weekends,” said the 74-year-old, affectionately known as India’s ‘Toilet Guru’.

The walls of the museum are plastered with toilet room jokes as well as Victorian-era pictures of ‘basket women’ in Europe carrying night-soil – fertiliser made from human faeces.

Toilets are a touchy issue in India where about 600 million people – nearly half of the population – defecate in the open, according to UNICEF. Some 70% of Indian households do not have a toilet – while 90% have access to mobile phones. More than half the world population does not have a home toilet.

Experts say open defecation in India stems from poverty and a belief that toilets inside the home are unclean. So people prefer to squat in the open. Three years ago, Prime Minister Narendra Modi launched a massive cleanliness drive, pledging to build toilets for all by 2019. So far the government has helped install more than 50 million toilets across the country of 1.3 billion people.

Sulabh International Museum of Toilets employee Nigar Imam explains a toilet compost system to nursing students. (AFP/Sajjad Hussain)

The Delhi museum’s collection also draws the curious to see a cushioned loo used in European gambling clubs which helped members keep an eye on table stakes without having to take a break.

One 18th century pot used by French royalty mocks the English by being designed as a stack of Shakespearean classic books. “It is very interesting to see and read about the quirky designs and the history behind them,” said Vinita Lodwal, a 25-year-old studying to be a nurse. “It’s informative and funny too,” said Lodwal, as she posed for a selfie with her friend in front of an ornately designed commode.

Source : http://www.hindustantimes.com/more-lifestyle/cushioned-loo-throne-cum-commode-more-here-s-what-to-see-at-delhi-s-toilet-museum/story-h6IyIQWhd94JGBaldmuMjJ.html

Posted by & filed under Articles, Haryana, In the Press, India, Photos, Press Releases, Sulabh News.

Chetna Choudhry| TNN | Nov 18, 2017, 23:12 IST

MEWAT: Marora village is all set to get 95 toilets on Sunday which is also marked as World Toilet Day. The toilets have been constructed by Sulabh International. The new toilets require lesser water for flushing, and the ecxrement will be converted into manure.

Earlier this year in June, Sulabh Intenational, the Social Service Organisation had renamed the Mewat’s Marora village as Trump Village in June this year and also claimed to have adopted the village. However, no official permission was sought for the same, and the posters of “Trump Gram” were removed by the district administration within 3 days of renaming.

However, now the organisation has made efforts to uplift the village. On Sunday, 95 households in the village will get toilets. Notably, there are 120 houses in the villages, out of which 95 houses didn’t have a toilet. Also, village’s government primary village will get two toilets. A temporary toilet sculpture will be unveiled in the village, to mark the technology.

Considering the water-shortage in the village, these toilets will have twin-pit technology. Under this, no sewerage line is required. Also, these toilets pots will use only one litre of water, as compared to the regular toilets. The excrement is collected underground pit and it will merge into the soil. After two years, the excrement will convert in manure after 24 months’ time.

“Each Sulabh Magic Toilet will cost around Rs 40,000 and it is going to help not only in keeping the village open defecation free, but will also socially uplift the area. We wanted to built toilets that work, and this technology is workable in the rural areas. As a result, the grooms in the village will also be now able to find themselves a bride,” said Dr Bindeshwar Pathak, founder, Sulabh International.

Source : https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/gurgaon/after-trump-rename-debacle-mewats-marora-village-to-finally-get-toilets/articleshow/61706179.cms

Posted by & filed under Articles, In the Press, India, Interviews, Photos, Press Releases, Sulabh News.

Gulf News

Fancy dress, culture and inspirational stories as India marks children’s day

Published: 13:41 November 13, 2017

Akhel Mathew, Correspondent; Lata Rani, Correspondent; Nilima Pathak, Correspondent; Pamela Raghunath, Correspondent

New Delhi: Children’s Day is celebrated in India on November 14, the birth anniversary of Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru, the first Prime Minister of India.

Most schools in India hold fancy dress competitions, painting contests, cultural programmes and fairs organised by children, for children. 

Let the children play

Here’s what some young people in India have to say about their hopes and dreams for themselves and their country:

Tishya Dubey
13 years, Grade 8, Navy Children School, Goa

I would love to see my country rise to greater heights and be a guiding light to other nations. Along with holding peaceful relations with other countries, I dream of an India with a high literacy rate. This aspect will gradually eliminate poverty, as more jobs would be created. I also wish to see my country become the greatest power — in terms of new inventions for the future of mankind — and a model nation as far as cleanliness in concerned. Striving to work in its interest, I hope to become a journalist. Since I am courageous and aware of my social responsibilities, I am aiming towards my goal. I not only find that journalism is a noble profession, it is also quite challenging and can satisfy the adventurous streak in me!

Amisha Sharkanya
15 years, Grade 10, Sulabh Public School, New Delhi

I dream of seeing India a richer, happier and healthier place to live in. I want to see it progress in all fields. Sadly, though people are becoming selfish and thinking of self before society and nation, how I wish people upheld great moral values, civic sense and love for the nation. There should also be justice, as we see so much disparity regarding caste and class everywhere. That could be the reason I dream of becoming a doctor. My even bigger dream is to some day be able to set up a hospital for the poor. Along with that, in my leisure time I desire to work towards improving the sanitary conditions of the poor, who are forced to live in unhygienic surroundings.

 

Siddharth Chugh
14 years, Grade 9, Delhi Public School, Mathura Road, New Delhi

What I want from India is that we restore the most important thing the Britishers took away from us. That is: our culture. I find Indians aping the West. And I want people to see the reality and accept themselves for what they really are and not become slaves of western thinking and mentality. By doing this, not only will we grow confident as a people, but also set an example for the coming generations. My desire at present is to become an engineer. And once I have established a strong financial base, I want to try out as many possibilities for the good of the nation. I would want to explore new avenues, meet new people to have a different perspective to life and live it to the fullest.

Saanvi Vasdev
10 years, Grade 5, Amity International School, Noida

I dream of my country as a prosperous, popular, safe and peaceful place. Since we see and read so much about unclean and polluted environment in most cities and towns, I very much want that India becomes a clean and green country. Apart from having healthy citizens, we will also attract tourists from across the world, which will help build our economy. To see my country grow further, I shall take up a job and become self-reliant. My dream is to become independent and do social service for the needy.

 

Vihaan Saxena
7 years, Grade 2, Amity International School, New Delhi

My dream for my country is to become a superpower. When I grow up, I want to become a scientist. I would work on invention of clean energy sources. I would also build a spaceship that would help me travel to deep space and explore various other galaxies. In my spare time, I would also create a time machine to see how people lived in ancient times in India and recover lost knowledge and science. And when I wake up from my dreams, I shall go to school and attend classes to learn and work hard to fulfil my dreams!

 

 

Faiza Anwar Khan
12, Sixth Standard, Loretto Convent, Chembur, Mumbai

“I’m fond of all my subjects in school but English is my favourite. That is why I dream of becoming an English teacher. English is a language that helps us to communicate with people from any country. There are so many TV channels in English which give a lot of information. Though I speak Hindi at home, and my national language is Hindi, I love chatting with my friends and brother in English.

“My hometown is Aurangabad and the only other places that I have visited is Hyderabad and Mahableshwar. I hope to see many other places in India when I grow up. My hobby is playing hockey, music, dance and applying ‘mehndi’ (henna) on my hands.

“I live in Mumbai which is crowded and people do not take care of it. It is my dream to see Mumbai and India become clean and where lovely plants and trees are grown everywhere. I also hope and dream that every Indian child goes to school and every person is honest.”

Hari Murthy
12, Seventh Standard, Our Lady of Perpetual School, Chembur, Mumbai

“After I finish school, I have decided to take up hotel management since I am impressed by my cousin who is studying and working in this field. My dream is to become a chef in a big hotel and then run my own restaurant after gaining experience. I always help my mother in cooking and my favourite dish is paneer tikka.

“My dream is to see big buildings being built in India so that every Indian has a nice house to live in. I also wish my country becomes clean since it is in a bad state now. In the place where I live, people throw garbage near my house. I do not want to see people going to the toilet in the open. “I enjoy playing football with my friends and watching Tamil movies, especially in which actor Surya is the hero.”

 

George Mathew
Age 14, Class 8, Mar Athanasius International School, Kothamangalam, Kerala

I dream of a tobacco-free India. Our country is losing too many people to cancer and other diseases caused by tobacco usage. This is a health hazard that we can and should put an end to. When I walk around, I can see shops selling tobacco and a lot of people smoking or chewing tobacco. This is avoidable and we must work towards a tobacco-free country.

I have not firmly decided on my dream, though I have a few. One thing that I wish to do is to join the Indian Foreign Service. Being part of that service, I will be able to spread the message about India around the world and influence people everywhere to contribute to India’s growth.

 

Tiya Elizabeth Jose
Class 10, Age 15, The Village International School, Thodupuzha, Kerala

I dream of an India where women are empowered and are secure. They should be able to move around with safety and security. India must eradicate its poverty. In Kerala I do not see much of it, but I am aware of the poverty in different parts of the country. Our nation must also have clean cities, and good politicians.

I would like to make enough money so that I can help a lot of people. I dream of doing charitable work. I have come across people who need help. There are a lot of orphans and others in our country who need assistance. They too have their dreams in life and I want to help them fulfil those dreams.

 

Amisha Rajshree
Class 11

“I have seen the rural populace in the grip of utter poverty. During my visits to the villages, I came across the poor people somehow filling up their empty belly and survive. Balanced food was not even the back of their mind.

Rampant corruption is yet another problem gripping the country. I have heard people and even read in newspapers giving bribes to officials for even small works, like for issuance of birth certificates or availing the old age pension. I want to fight against corruption and poverty. They are blots on the face of my country.

As for myself, I want to become an Indian Administrative Service (IAS) officer to executive these plans. A district magistrate is in charge of a district having enough power to executive the welfare plans. It’s strange that even seven decades after independence, the poor country men are yet to get the benefits of government’s welfare schemes with full freedom.

Becoming an IAS officer also involves a lot of prestige and glory in the society and I want to achieve this task. None from my family has qualified for this job.

Kumari Ishika, Class seven: My country still lags behind in matter of technology as compared to foreign nations and I want to develop many facilities for the country men. I want to improve the current system which is not in sync with the changing times.

Although many technological changes have taken place in the past few decades but there are still many areas which needs proper attention. Good books still remain out of reach of poor students since they don’t have enough money to buy. Moreover, we can’t purchase just every book. I wish to develop apps which provide all the study materials free of cost.

As for myself, I want to become an IIT (Indian Institute of Technology) engineer. None in my family is an IIT engineer although my grandfather worked in engineering field. Also, IIT engineers are in great demand across the globe and I love to work for top companies like Google and Facebook which have attractive salary packages.

Source : http://gulfnews.com/news/asia/india/india-children-s-dreams-for-the-country-and-themselves-1.2123706