Posted by & filed under Articles, In the Press, Uttar Pradesh.

Lucknow: Sulabh International, the NGO promoting low-cost sanitation and hygiene, on Wednesday said it would provide a monthly aid of Rs 1,000 to widows living in penury in Vrindavan in Uttar Pradesh.

The aid for August had been distributed to the widows living in four government shelters, Sulabh founder Bindeshwar Pathak said on the last day of his visit to the temple town.

He said the payments would be made on the fifth day of every month.

In addition, the NGO was also purchasing four ambulances to provide 24×7 service to the widows.

Sulabh has also opened a centre to look after healthcare, last rites and other welfare measures of the widows.

Pathak said that Sulabh would "always be doing everything that was possible to ensure a dignified life to these women in their twilight years, and more so a dignity in death".

The measures come after Supreme Court recently suggested that International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON) and Sulabh be contacted to find out whether they could help the 1,790 widows living in deplorable conditions in four state government shelters in Vrindavan.

The apex court had also directed the Uttar Pradesh government to at least ensure proper last rites of the widows.

Source : http://zeenews.india.com/news/uttar-pradesh/sulabh-disburses-monthly-aid-to-vrindavan-widows_795193.html

Posted by & filed under Articles, In the Press, Uttar Pradesh.

 

Lucknow : Sulabh International, the NGO promoting low-cost sanitation and hygiene, Wednesday said it would provide a monthly aid of Rs.1,000 to widows living in penury in Vrindavan in Uttar Pradesh.

The aid for August had been distributed to the widows living in four government shelters, Sulabh founder Bindeshwar Pathak said on the last day of his visit to the temple town.

He said the payments would be made on the fifth day of every month.

In addition, the NGO was also purchasing four ambulances to provide 24×7 service to the widows.

Sulabh has also opened a centre to look after healthcare, last rites and other welfare measures of the widows.

Pathak told IANS that Sulabh would "always be doing everything that was possible to ensure a dignified life to these women in their twilight years, and more so a dignity in death".

The measures come after Supreme Court recently suggested that International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON) and Sulabh be contacted to find out whether they could help the 1,790 widows living in deplorable conditions in four state government shelters in Vrindavan.

The apex court had also directed the Uttar Pradesh government to at least ensure proper last rites of the widows. 

Source : http://twocircles.net/2012aug22/sulabh_disburses_monthly_aid_vrindavan_widows.html#.UDUMOexD0D0

Posted by & filed under Articles, India, Sulabh News.

After launching a scheme to help the widows of Vrindavan, Sulabh International today announced its decision to give a monthly dole of Rs 1,000 each to such women to prevent them from starvation and begging.

Making the announcement, Sulabh Founder, Bindeshwar Pathak, said the organisation has decided to make the payment on the fifth day of every calendar month.

Sulabh has already handed over Rs 1,000 each to widows living in four ashrams in Vrindavan in the last four days, he said.

To ensure prompt healthcare to the widows, the organisation has placed orders for four well-equipped ambulances to be kept alert round-the-clock exclusively for them.

The organisation, known for promoting low-cost sanitation, has opened a Sulabh centre which would monitor the healthcare facility, last rites and other welfare measures for widows.

Sulabh had on August 12 announced to take care of widows following the Supreme Court taking a strong exception recently to the manner in which the bodies of widows, who lived in government shelter homes at Vrindavan, were disposed.

The court asked NALSA (National Legal Service Authority) to contact Sulabh International to find out whether they could come forward to help the 1,780 odd widows living in four government shelters at Vrindavan, Pathak said. 

Source : http://www.business-standard.com/generalnews/news/sulabh-international-to-give-rs-1000-per-month-to-widows/46954/

Posted by & filed under Articles, Sulabh News, Uttar Pradesh.

MASEMBE TAMBWE in Bhopal

 

Good fortune couldn’t have come better to Anita Narre, the Indian now famed bride who ran away from her husband after finding that he didn’t have a toilet, after a local NGO slapped her with 4,000 US Dollars.

Sulabh Sanitation and Social Reform Movement Founder, Dr Bindeshwar Pathak travelled 500kms from Bhopal to present Anita the 4000 US Dollars cheque for what we termed as a ‘courageous yet very peculiar move’.

“This is the first time I have heard of an Indian woman leaving her husband because he didn’t have a toilet in the premises of his house. This move is usually not only an insult to her in laws but also to her parents but because of her cause, we have decided to award her,” he said.

Dr Pathak told journalists yesterday that he first learnt of the story, he was visibly intrigued by it and promised himself that he would give her the recognition she deserves for the bold step she took.

The Local Government Village Executive Officer, Ms Lalita Narre said that when she learnt that Anita had left her husband because of the lack of toilet facilities, she supported her out rightly.

She revealed that thanks to the bold move of Anita, in a space of two weeks, 95 out of 150 households that previously didn’t have toilet have now constructed toilets and the rest are underway.

“I am very proud of her and forever grateful to her because for years we have tried spreading awareness to the women on the importance of having toilets within the home but our efforts have always landed on empty ears,” she said.

Anita Narre explained that it took her only two days after moving in with her husband to reach the decision that unless her husband built a toilet, she would go back to her parents and not return until there was one.

She narrated that on her first day we had to walk 2km away from her house to go and ease herself and vowed that she wouldn’t undergo that torture everyday unless something was done.

“I grew up in an environment that had toilets within the premises of the homestead. I confided with my husband about my concerns and when I saw nothing was being done about it, I took matters into my own hand,” she said.

Her husband, Shevram said that he understood how she felt but at that time he wasn’t in the financial position to construct one but things changed when she left forcing him to seek assistance from the local government office and in eight days, one was constructed and the wife returned.

Ms Anita said that it was beyond her wildest dreams that her story would arouse so much media attention and she will be forever thankful to the Sulabh International Social Service Organisation for the token that they had awarded her.

“With this boost, I will now be able to construct a bathroom where my family and I can comfortably bathe from as well as give our house a facelift,” she said.

She said that it was her dream that a time would come where all women in India and other parts of the world have access to clean and hygienic toilet facilities and no longer have to walk long distances and at awkward hours to simply answer a call of nature.

A social worker stationed in Bhopal and a Sulabh employee, Ms Swati Khemaria said that Anita broke one of India’s biggest taboos, leaving your husband’s home and returning to your own unescorted and for something as mere as a toilet.

Ms Swati explained that in Indian tradition, once a woman is married, she belongs to her in laws and isn’t supposed to return to her parents irrespective to the conditions that she is facing at her in laws.

Open defecating is still one of the biggest challenges to sanitation in India and in many other parts of the world. It is estimated by the World Health Organisation that approximately 2.6 billion do not have toilet facilities in the world.

Source : http://washfair.blogspot.in/2012/02/bride-who-fled-hubby-for-having-no.html?spref 

Posted by & filed under Articles, Sulabh News, Uttar Pradesh.

It was exactly a year ago that The Hindu wrote about the plight of abandoned and destitute women, particularly widows, who take shelter in Vrindavan, prompting the National Legal Services Authorities (NALSA) to take action. It filed a social justice litigation before the Supreme Court for ameliorating the pitiable condition of these women and directing the District Legal Services Authority of Mathura to conduct a survey of these destitute women.

On Sunday, when Sulabh International – one of the two non-governmental organisations chosen by the Apex Court to provide help to these unfortunate women— went to Vrindavan to announce free dinner for those living in government-run shelter homes and facilities for a dignified cremation, it almost resulted in a stampede with the inmates scrambling to receive Rs 500 distributed by the founder of Sulabh International Bindeshwar Pathak.

The corridors of Swadhar Mahila Ashray at Chaitanya Vihar-11 which presented a serene look last year with the inmates preferring to keep to themselves suddenly became riotous as women from the nearby shelter homes also turned up to receive the money and enjoy a good meal which included `jalebi.’ The entry of ‘outsiders’ evoked anger among the residents of this hostel who came out of their rooms to guard the premises. It took a while before the situation was brought under control and women-both from this ashram and others – were made to queue up to receive a one-time grant of Rs 500 after ensuring their name was registered for receiving regular dinner. “From tomorrow every woman in government-run hostel will receive Rs 25 per day for dinner. No woman will sleep hungry,’’ Mr Pathak told a group of media persons who had accompanied him to Vrindavan. Whether women would be given cash so that they cook their own food or whether they will be provided pre-cooked food would be decided by Monday when Sulabh shoulders the responsibility of providing a decent dinner at four government-run shelter homes.

In a recent order, the court had asked the NALSA to contact the Sulabh International to find out whether they could come forward to help the 1,780-odd widows living in four government shelters at Vrindavan. Sulabh International will also speak to the local authorities to fund the setting up of an electric crematorium where these women could be given a dignified cremation. With his vast experience in the field of low-cost sanitation and social upliftment of the manual scavengers, Mr Pathak said capable widows would be motivated to undergo vocational training so that they can earn their livelihood. “Sulabh will arrange training and provide employment to able-bodied widows,” he said. On being asked about those in private shelter homes and those without shelter, Mr Pathak said the process had just started and would eventually cover as many as possible. He said the organisation would arrange regular health check ups for the widows.

“Right now we will start on our own, but at the same time we will approach Central as well as State governments and big corporate houses for help. The idea is to ensure a dignified life to the widows,” he added.

The Supreme Court had recently directed the Uttar Pradesh government to at least ensure that proper last rites were performed to Vrindavan widows as per their religion after the DLSA Mathura report suggested that at some places, the bodies of the widows were cut to piece for disposal by sweepers as there was no provision for cremation at these homes. While most women seemed indifferent to the proposals, others claimed that many rich people did come to the ashrams off and on to distribute alms and cash. “What we need is respect and dignity. We can forgo one meal but cannot be fighting with each other like cats and dogs for just Rs 500. “Getting photographed while receiving money is so disgraceful,” an inmate said as she made a futile attempt to find a place in the queue. agencies

Source : http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2012%5C08%5C13%5Cstory_13-8-2012_pg14_7#.UCjIMYJkR6g 

Posted by & filed under Articles, Delhi, In the Press.

(WNN/GPI) New Delhi, INDIA: Each dawn brings the same battle for Sangeeta Devi. The simple act of defecation takes tactful planning for the 30-year-old. For Devi, a local community worker, it’s a matter of life or death. Devi, like the other women of her slum, lacks a toilet in her home. So she wakes up early when it’s still dark, walks toward the bushes on the edge of the slum and squats there to relieve herself.

The daily humiliation is taking a toll on her dignity, she says. But open defecation is more than embarrassing. Often, men hide in the areas women commonly use to go to the bathroom, knowing that this is a position and time when they are vulnerable.

“Once, a few men put a blanket over me and tried to kidnap me,” Devi says. “I shouted at the top of my voice, and somehow, I managed to escape. But everyone is not lucky like me.”

Devi doesn’t live in poverty-stricken rural India, but right in the heart of the national capital, New Delhi. Her slum, Kirbi Place, is home to migrant laborers from poor northern states. Representative of urban poverty, it lacks sanitation and other basic amenities like scores of other unregistered New Delhi slums.

Inadequate sanitation forces women in both rural and urban areas of India to defecate in the open, leaving them vulnerable to sexual violence. Lack of toilets or maintenance of them also creates health hazards. It forces girls to drop out of school and women to quit their jobs. Some women have improved sanitation in their communities by advocating for change. The government proposes a public-private system in response to citizen demands for the prioritization of sanitation, especially in the city’s slums.

Jairam Ramesh, minister of drinking water and sanitation, recently presented to Parliament that 60 percent of India’s population and 70 percent of women don’t have access to a toilet. In July 2012, he deemed India the world’s capital of open defecation, according to local media. He also checked excitement about successful missile tests by lamenting that there is no use launching missiles if there are no toilets for women.

The capital is not exempt from the toilet troubles. New Delhi has only 132 public toilets for women, while men have 1,534, according to a 2009 report by the Centre for Civil Society, a nongovernmental research and educational organization devoted to improving citizens’ quality of life.

Suman Chahar, an expert in environmental sanitation and public health, has been working closely with communities in New Delhi, including Devi’s, for the past 17 years.

“This is a very grave and daily issue, particularly for these women,” Chahar says of open defecation. “It concerns their security, health and dignity. Along with shocking incidents of rape and molestation and lewd remarks, I have heard shocking stories of what all these women go through if accidentally they found a man from their community ‘sitting’ next to them in the row.”

The “row” is the line women form outside in the morning and evening to relieve themselves.

Maya Rajasthani, 36, a resident of Rajiv Gandhi Camp, a former refugee camp that is now a slum in New Delhi, describes how the people there lived without a toilet for nearly 25 years.

“While cases of molestation were common, things got ugly when a few girls were raped on their way to the vacant park near the slum, where they had gone to defecate,” the mother of three says.

Bindeshwar Pathak, founder of Sulabh International Social Service Organisation, a nongovernmental organization working to make cost-effective toilets available to rural communities, is a pioneer in India’s sanitation movement and has been working in the field for the last four decades.

Pathak says that women in rural India often have to wait until dusk or dawn to sneak out to the fields to relieve themselves, risking molestation as well as bites from scorpions and snakes.

In addition to safety risks, the lack of toilets creates health hazards, Chahar says.

“These women look sick and anemic,” she observes of women in urban slum dwellings.

In slums where there are toilets, other health risks abound for residents because of lack of maintenance.

“During rains, the dirty water [from toilets] enters their huts, and life is miserable for them,” Chahar says. “We have to understand that the risk of infection is more in women. Also, waterborne diseases like diarrhea and stomachache are common.”

Toilet access also affects education for girls.

Chahar says that while there are no toilets in schools in rural areas, there is no upkeep of the toilet complexes in schools in urban areas. Teachers complain that children spoil or dirty the property, she says, so they keep bathrooms locked instead of allowing students constant access to it.

“It’s shocking that teachers often lock the toilets,” she says.

The lack of access to toilets causes girls ages 12 to 18 to miss around five days of school per month, or around 50 school days per year, according to the 2011 Annual Status of Education Report released by India’s minister of human resource development. Almost 23 percent of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating.

The lack of toilets also affects educated and working women who live in the city’s center.

Joyoti Chopra, a resident of New Delhi, says she was appalled that the building housing the office of the nongovernmental organization where she worked had no proper toilet facilities for women. So she quit her job to advocate for sanitation facilities for women.

Even where there are community toilet complexes with men’s and women’s facilities, people don’t heed the signs.

“How can you have a man casually use lady’s toilets in the posh city?” she asks. “It’s alarming.”

Open defecation is not only a problem because of the lack of toilets, Chopra says. It’s also a behavioral problem. The reason that India has more mobile phones than toilets, she says, is because hygiene and sanitation don’t receive the same attention as new technology.

Like Chopra, other women are also taking a stand.

Rajasthani organized marches and regular visits to local politicians for two years until she secured funding for toilets for her area in 2007.

Newlywed Priyanka Kumari made news in April 2012 for leaving her marital house in Kushinagar, a district in northern India’s Uttar Pradesh state, within days of her wedding because there was no toilet.

“Like my mother-in-law and other women of the area, I was supposed to go out in the fields, which I found very humiliating,” she says. “I gave my husband an ultimatum to get the toilet constructed.”

Sulabh International Social Service Organisation awarded her and two other brides from Uttar Pradesh who took similar action with 200,000 rupees ($3,700) as well as built toilets in their homes. It also gave 2.5 million rupees ($46,000) to Kumari’s community to improve sanitation.

But the lack of toilets or maintenance of existing facilities will be a problem until sanitation becomes a priority in India, Pathak says. In an urban context, the problem lies in unregistered slums erected on government property. The government, instead of waiting to recognize them, should construct a satisfactory number of toilet complexes.

“This is an issue that affects everyone, regardless of class,” Pathak says. “Whatever we have in Delhi is not adequate to meet the demand of the population. We should at least have 50,000 well-maintained toilets.”

Yogender Maan, spokesman of Municipal Corporation of Delhi, a governmental body that handles New Delhi’s civic amenities, agrees that the capital needs more toilet complexes in general, and in its slum areas in particular.

“Various surveys have been carried out by various agencies to point out the need for better sanitation facilities in the city,” Maan says. “We are aiming at creating a public-private system where government will construct the toilet complexes and various market associations and residents will come forward for their upkeep. The problems, however, is complex for slum areas.”

Source : http://womennewsnetwork.net/2012/12/19/india-women-new-delhi-slum-toilets/

Posted by & filed under Articles, In the Press, Uttar Pradesh.

NGO Sulabh International on Sunday announced that it would take proper care of Virndavan widows after Supreme Court noted their miserable plight.

"From today onwards, no widow of Virandavan will sleep without food. Each and every widow will get food every night," Sulabh founder Bindeshwar Pathak said while launching a programme for destitutes here.

The apex court had recently taken a strong exception to the manner in which the bodies of widows, who lived in government shelter homes at Vrindavan, were disposed – by chopping them into pieces and putting them in gunny bags – on the plea of lack of money for proper cremation.

The court had expressed serious concern over lack of provision of food as well.


The court asked the NALSA (National Legal Service Authority) to contact the Sulabh International to find out whether they could come forward to help the 1,780-odd widows living in four government shelters at Vrindavan.




“Now, we will take care of every need of the widows and orphans who roam about and beg on the streets of Vrindavan. Sulabh will ensure food, clothing, proper health care and hygiene," Pathak said.



With his vast experience in the field of low-cost sanitation and social uplift of the manual scavengers, the Sulabh founder said his first task would be to motivate the orphans and able bodied widows to undergo vocational training so that they can earn their livelihood.

"Sulabh will arrange training and provide employment to able-bodied widows," he said.



Pathak said his organisation has liberated a large number of women from the inhuman job of carrying night soil on their head that they had been doing for generations, given them vocational training, provided them education and ensured that they live a life of self respect.


"We can use our vast experience here in Vrindavan and see that the widows no longer live as an unwanted burden on the society," he said.


"This will be the new mission of Sulabh, which is hitherto known for waging the cause of untouchability," said Pathak, who has worked in fields of sanitation technology, social enterprise and healthcare education.

He said the organisation would arrange regular health check ups for the widows so that their physical ailments could be minimised.


"We cannot remove their mental agony, but at least we can apply a healing balm on their physical sufferings," he said.


"Right now we will start on our own, but at the same time we will approach central as well as state governments and big corporate houses for help. The idea is to ensure a dignified life to the widows," he added.



The SC bench of Justices DK Jain and Madan B Lokur had recently directed the Uttar Pradesh government to at least ensure that proper last rites were performed to Vrindavan widows as per their religion.

Source : http://english.samaylive.com/regional-news/uttar-pradesh-news/676511167/vrindavan-widows-sulabh-promises-help.html 

 

Posted by & filed under Articles, Sulabh News, Uttar Pradesh.

Brindavan (Uttar Pradesh), Aug 12 (IANS) Sulabh International has pledged to give a life a dignity to the 1,700 odd widows of Brindavan who spend their sunset years in pain.

Responding to the shock expressed by the Supreme Court over the inhuman disposal of the bodies of widows, Sulabh founder Bindeshwar Pathak announced steps to provide them a dignified life.

The apex court has taken a strong exception to the manner in which the bodies of some widows were disposed of — by chopping them into pieces and stuffing them into gunny bags — on grounds of resource crunch.

The court directed the Uttar Pradesh government to ensure that decent last rites were performed.

‘We will take care of every need of the widows and orphans who roam the lanes of Brindavan and beg for food. Sulabh will provide food, clothing, proper healthcare and hygiene,’ Pathak said.

Sulabh will also impart training and provide employment to able-bodied widows, he said.

Source : http://www.firstpost.com/fwire/sulabh-promises-to-help-widows-of-brindavan-415564.html#.UCfF_OKdWIQ

Posted by & filed under In the Press, India, Interviews.

LCI: Sir, you are a benchmark for socialist entrepreneurs, which is not a very easy path. What is your 21st century strategy for your organization?

Ans: My case is little different. I wanted to be lecturer in the department of sociology. I joined a society which was formed to celebrate the birth century of Mahatma Gandhi. It was the year 1968.I did my graduation in 1964 in continuation I couldn’t do my MA, but later I did MA in Sociology in English and I did my PHD, I did many things but not in continuity so I become a school teacher, did a small job and finally I was satisfied. There I got this idea to fulfill the dreams of Mahatma Gandhi to restore the human rights and dignity of the untouchables who used to clean human excreta. Gandhi was concerned for them and also we have literal issue of defecation in open, so I was there in the society for two and half years it was difficult for me to work because by birth I belong to a Brahmin cast, I touched a lady untouchable when I was a child and for that matter my grandmother forced me to sallow cow-dung and cow urine and drink Ganga's water to purify myself. It actually was chilly winter but she forced me to take bath. So that was the background, so, when I was told to fulfill the dreams of Mahatma Gandhi I shared this story to my general secretary that sir -I am from Brahmin cast and it is difficult for me because we were told all the time not to take food from this hand or other hand. Secondly, I was not an engineer so unless I give alternative to bucket toilets to clean untouchables how I can ask you not to use buckets toilet. She didn’t check this she said no-no I don’t know all this I see light in you that you can do. I do not know why she said this. Then I went and lived in colony of untouchables and scavengers for three months. It was taught to us to build repo with the community for which you want to work so I went and lived in the colony of untouchables and I had food with them, talk to them about their values and so forth. One day in the fine morning a newlywed girl. She was being forced by in-laws to go to backyard town to clean bucket tribe. She was trying very hard with them and was not ready to go I went and intervene but her mother in law asked me what you would do from tomorrow if she says that forbid by from one hand I have no answer .After few days a boy wearing red shirt he was attacked by the bull. People rushed to save him but somebody shouted from the back that he belonged to untouchable colony everyone backed soon and the boy was injured in such a way we took him to hospital and he was declared dead there. By going and staying to the untouchable colony I was not sure that I will continue because my father was very sad and ours early marriage then in the hospital I forgot my father in law my father and my Brahmin community and there I secured how to fulfill the dreams of Gandhi, that is the beginning. I am writing a book “toilet a tool of social change” so here we have seen the technology now so two technologies are most crucial because with old system we are not going to achieve to stop defecation in open or manual cleaning of human excreta. So I invented the technology which is appropriate, affordable, indigenous and perpetual. In the beginning people had a subtle views now they have accepted as happens it’s a long story I am leaving it here, so I installed two toilets in a small town of Hara in Bihar and from there journey begin so I worked in the Gandhi community then the chief minister of Bihar and the minister concerned he asked me to formed this Sulabh and he said that you form the organization and we will get it recognized with government. So with this initiative Sulabh was always called Sulabh Shochalya sansthan now a Sulabh International so it was founded. (I am explaining all this because of social entrepreneurship) so as usual I also applied for the grant Rs.70000 roughly or 5000 $ from the govt. So Secretary to the department he asked me to come and then I went to see him he started laughing I was surprised that why he is laughing. He asked me who are you, I said sir I am the secretary of the organization you asked me to come to see you, he said yes-yes I ordered for the tea already, I thought an old man with a stick in his hand, a freedom fighter will come to see me you are just a young boy. Did you work with Gandhi? I said When Gandhi ji assassinated, I was 5 years old. He offered me a cup of tea and said I have gone through your file have you did these entire thing. I said yes sir; he said your programme is going to create a great impact in this country in sanitation sector and he said this in 1971. At that time Sulabh was very new. Can an IAS officer visualize it. Then he said I see danger in it he said the danger is you are asking for a grant. he expressed that getting funds will be an issue. This year you will get a grant of 1 000 $, next year the finance department will raise the objections and then after two years again you will get 1000 $, your programme will not continue. So I have a thought for you, you don’t take grant you take money from the implementation of the programme and unless until you use the misuse of money of some agency of some people your programme will continue I said sir I will not misuse it he said no-no now you don’t have any money but a man changes when he gets money. So before writing on the file I want one guarantee from you not a bank guarantee but a moral guarantee that you will not misuse any money, can you remember my face?  I said, Of course, Sir. When you try to misuse the money of the government or any agency or anybody you will remember me once. I promised that no sir I will not misuse any money I wrote on the file that the organization should not be given grants it’s been given a work and out of saving it should run the organization and that is the beginning how from grant taking to self reliance started from there. So first check I got it took time it’s a long story so first check I got is of Rs 10$ so man who sent the check he asked his clerk to come if he misuses the money what will happen, he saw me from top to bottom, no sir the boy doesn’t look like this and if he does so you can deduct the same from my salary he said no my salary is more than you, you don’t know him I know him from before why do you take guarantee I take his guarantee and he gave me the check. And now, Sulabh is handling the project of 70-80 million $ per annum.  I used to go house to house to motivate and speak to people, provide the material like bricks, cement and so many and so forth and to get constructed toilets. Now we have 60000 men working in this country and also we have worked in Kabul and Afghanistan and right now we are working in Uganda. We have chain 14 countries of South Africa.  So the question is that is to see the entrepreneurship I didn’t initiate, it came from the idea from somebody but it became successful that is important, so why people say this entrepreneurship only because the social work have never been so successful. The rest of them depend on the grants and donations. How this entrepreneurship became so successful I have just told you.

LCI: Jairam Ramesh recently said- "Indian Railways is the world's biggest open toilet." What steps should be taken to improve the sanitation of the Railways?

Dr. Pathak: I was also one of the members in the IIT Kanpur and when they decided to have biological toilets which they have installed in some trains but if you see the speed it will take 100 years minimum to cover the entire structures. What I have suggested is that there should be containers in the bottom and the maximum duration of stoppage is from Trivandrum to Jammu is 13 hours except that all the stoppages are of 6-7 hours. So, on the stoppage you have to take out container and put other container and there should be a biogas plant near railway stations and there you can empty the containers and that also can be used for lighting street lights etc. The only solution at present is elide subject that can be used for tomorrow but for the present this is the only possible answer where the human excreta will not fall on the tracks and then only we can save the railways stations from the human fesses. This is the only alternative but they didn’t accept the same and they have just started some experimentation on biological toilets and now they have 5-6 trains built like this. Sewerage was built in India in 1870. London was the first town in 1850 New York was the second city in 1860 and Kolkata is the third city in 1870. And from 1870 to right now the number of the cities has been grown up to 7935 approximately and the sewerage planning has been done only in 160 towns so in 142 years, only 160 town in 7935 towns (I am not talking about villages) I am talking about urban only so what about biological toilets but anyways God bless them and if they can do we are happy with that.

LCI: Your organization is very different with a vital mission on Sanitation. You have a prayer and encyclopedia also on Sanitation. If we were to look into the working of an NGO or an organization- what are some of the beliefs and systems of your organization that you foster?

Dr.Pathak: What is important is human development, so the work has to be blended with philosophy and the spiritual aspects of the life unless you combine together you cannot be a happy person. You must have read in newspaper that one very rich person of US who owned many islands etc, His granddaughter name is Suklana. One day it came in a newspaper that she stays very busy. I thought she is granddaughter of a person who is one of the richest person in this world and why she was busy? It means wealth alone cannot make us happy. Success alone cannot make us happy so we have to blend what is the philosophy and in Sulabh you will surely find we have tried to combine all together. And if you have seen the prayer, Gandhi used to pray at 4 am but due to office timings it is not possible to do it at that time so we do it 10am. So it is a great job to enjoy happiness, look other things, and look at wisdom how to tackle it and how to wear it.  So in Sulabh its not only sanitation or about untouchables or restoration of the people who use to clean but it’s a combination of human development and the fact in the prayer we talk about the human beings, we talk about humanity and mankind but we don’t talk about the nations, religion and cast. So this is mostly important.

LCI: Your organization works at the very grass-root level. Do you believe that the high pay-cheque awaiting MBAs are ready to devote their time for a more universal cause and join NGOs?

Dr. Pathak: They can do better. What we have done exceptionally the way I am a drop out. But those who have more knowledge and more education they have basic skills of cleanliness, appreciation of beauty and good place. So suppose when Dr. Been Pandey he came from London and he went to Gandhi ashram and asked Gandhi to give some work Gandhi said you are PHD from London what will you do in ashram, he said no give me some work. So after 6 months Gandhi become very angry and said ok go and clean toilets and he did so for six months and he did it so nicely because he was very educated person. So later he was appointed as a personal secretary of Gandhi. So if those who are MBAs and Law graduates and if they want to come to this sector, they can have good and decent living and they can do good work so it is required now they should come. And the young boys and girls who have good education should come in this sector because what we have done it is clear in that image. Beginning is the beginning we have done the things so far we have found the way, but much have to be done throughout the country in India and around the worlds so therefore I would welcome if the students of MBAs and the Law if they can come and join this sector.

LCI: Dr.Pathank, you personify a true initiator. You struggled so much to live this dream and bring about the revolution in sanitation. There is a dearth of initiative-takers. Is there something wrong in the upbringing of our youth than needs correction?

Dr. Pathak: No-No youths of the India are well informed then in our days. If a small child comes to us he is so updated with latest information we cannot compare and there’s no comparison of knowledge in older times and today. We just need to guide them and need to show them right way. Now I have started an institute i.e. Sulabh Iinternational Institute for empowerment. I wanted to be a teacher and become or a lecturer and now I am a perfect teacher and I can teach the subject of sanitation in detail and I have experience and expertise in this subject real teacher I became and now if I can pass this knowledge and experience to young boys and girls they can do good work in their own field. They just need proper guidance, we need to empower them with the training and they can do much better work than us. Girls and boys are up-to-date and more informed more aptitude more committed to work. Only problem is that they have gone to software only and stopped working for India. So if you give emphasis on software give emphasis on hardware also. (For me I was borne with a silver spoon. Later on by father sold all the properties, I have experienced both richness and only poverty object to vertical sides) so therefore as and they have felt India thing wrong about doing hardware so therefore now we should teach both hardware and software If you can go today for hardware you can go tomorrow in software but if you don’t know the hardware only software the problem arises. So that is required in this country that the teaching should be on both side the moment computer goes down they all say-oh! No employment. Employment is there but you don’t want to work in field or in hardware side, jobs are there but today youth feel job means only in software. After coming from office they want to go to Gym, Pub, Bar or Club. And if they ask to go in filed they deny. So now a days the boys and girls should be given training of both sides and there’s no problem.  Youth needs proper training and guidance.

LCI: 'The various social strata only divide and weaken our existence and development'- What is your dream for the future of civilization and how can we achieve this?

Dr.Pathak: Pundit Nehru said once in Germany in 56, so when they asked from Nehru where you feel that your country will be advanced country he said that the day every citizen will have a flush toilet in their house I will feel India has achieved development and progressed so civilization means you should have proper facilities and amenities in the house. India has two problems-one is the lack of sanitation toilets and secondly lack of culture of proper sanitation. You must have gone foreign countries and you must have seen that when they go to toilet if something goes wrong they clean it and they come out. In India they go to toilet and then Ram- Ram, now the problem is of toilet cleaner. So Indians we have to taught both on one hand we have to provide them the facility and on the other hand we have to tell them how to improve the culture of sanitation. You must have seen our restaurants they are very clean, food is good, decoration is good the moment you go to the toilet it’s horrible that shows the culture of the owner of the restaurant if they can afford good food and decoration and clean restaurant why not good toilet. So therefore in 21st century if you want to civilize you should stop defecation in open at the earliest and also develop a culture of sanitation then only we can call ourselves a civilized society.

LCI: Lastly, what will be your message to the grooming MBAs and Professionals of our Community?

Dr.Pathak: “One mission one life” that will fulfill and if you have many missions in your life it will be difficult to achieve. So therefore from age of 25 to 40 this is real age of a human. From 25 to 45 if you are successful anywhere then you will go up if you are not successful in this period then you will not be able to contribute. So the first thing is “One Mission One Life”. I am in this field of sanitation for the past 42 years, I was speaking in one assembly once and after the lecture one lady from Uganda came to me he caught may hand and said what did you say 35 years only one job and nothing else only sanitation I said yes madam. The question is how long you want to continue a career. Then although this is difficult to suggest but there are three layers one if you love your work more than your wife and children more then you are on top if you love your wife your children and your work on par then you are second and if you love your wife and children first and work second then you are third and you have to decide on which layer you want to be achieve. My case is the first layer and if you ask me what independence you have in your life so I can say I couldn’t play with my children, I couldn’t drop them to school, I couldn’t go out with my family so that is only I can tell you so therefore if you want to number one then you have to work very hard. Then there are five things vision, mission, commitment, capabilities and eviction. If you could combine all five together, you can become a very successful person. And lastly, God has helped you somewhere that should be morality of life. You can earn your livelihood but you should not forget  In Quran it is said before you eat just check up with the neighbor’s whether they have taken food or not so that motto should be in life and that will give you satisfaction.

Source : http://www.lawyersclubindia.com/articles/What-is-civilised-India-In-conversation-with-Dr-Pathak-of-Sulabh–4969.asp#.UNAyheR3b0d