Posted by & filed under Articles, Delhi, In the Press.

Describing manual scavenging as ‘despicable’, Lok Sabha Speaker Meira Kumar lamented that the caste system and untouchability existing in India.  



She said 'unless the society cleanse its mind of all the ills, no amount of effort can get rid of such practices.’ The Speaker said Parliament should also rise to the occasion to meet the expectations of the nation and the House should be allowed to function to conduct its business.



Strongly pitching for a massive nation-wide social campaign to meet the target of eradicating manual scavenging, Union Rural Development Minister Jairam Ramesh on Monday favoured early passage of a bill to check the social evil. 'I urge Lok Sabha Speaker Meria Kumar to use her power to ensure early passage of the bill to curb manual scavenging,' said Ramesh at a workshop in Delhi.



Kumar was present on the opening day of the two-day national workshop organized by Sulabh International Centre for Action Sociology in close collaboration with Sulabh International Social Service Organisation., which has so far built toilets for 10 million people in India.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source : http://millenniumpost.in/NewsContent.aspx?NID=19565

Posted by & filed under Articles, Delhi, In the Press.

The Minister of State (Independent Charge) Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation Shri Bharatsinh Solanki addressing the Workshop on Sociology of Sanitation- Environmental Sanitation, Public Health and Deprivation, in New Delhi today, emphasised the need of educating various sections of the people to improve sanitation, health, environment and to help liberate scavenging system from the country.  He said, ‘The availability of safe sanitation system is one of the important factors to gauge socio-economic and cultural development of any country. Safe disposal of human wastes has been a matter of concern since early civilization in different parts of the world. In Vedas it has been made very clear that driving away diseases and building human strength is definitely not possible without proper sanitation and adoption of hygienic rules.’ However, today major part of population of this region lack basic sanitation facility and opts for defecation in open.  Shri Bharatsinh Solanki said that sanitary household toilet is the most important aspect of sanitation. The total economic impact of inadequate sanitation in India is estimated to be Rs 2.44 trillion a year which is equivalent to 6.4 per cent of India’s GDP in 2006, according to a study by the World Bank.  It is an accepted fact that poor pay more directly and indirectly due to bad sanitation. Most of them who earn on daily wages lose out in case of illness due to bad sanitation. Further, other members of the family who look after the sick member also lose their daily earnings or schooling (in the case of children).  Shri Solanki said, Open defecation has been a deep-rooted age old socially inherited behaviour in rural India. Provision of adequate sanitation coverage in rural India still remains a major challenge despite rising incomes and advent of new and more cost effective technologies, due to various mindsets. India a recognised leader in information technology and nuclear science still has a substantive proportion of the rural poor still defecate in the open, rather than investing on sanitary toilets. This may be because sanitation is neither a felt need nor is open defecation a socio-cultural taboo. Investing on a toilet is not a priority as of now for many of them. he said, well over 600 million Indians continue to lack access to even the most basic of sanitation facilities forcing them to defecate in the open.  There is a considerable gap between access and use of toilet in rural areas. This could be due to various reasons like lack of proper privacy-providing super structure, lack of proper design, lack of maintenance or lack of required awareness to use toilets. Many of such toilets have been found actually dysfunctional. Many toilets have been reported to be used as store houses for dry cow dung cakes or for other purposes. Due to such reasons, there is considerable gap between the number of toilets constructed and those in actual use. To minimize such gaps, and ensure proper use of toilets, awareness is required for which the role of NGOs is crucial. As late Prime Minister Mrs. Indira Gandhi once said – Sanitation in India is not only cleanliness, it is also an end of the humiliation and miseries of scavengers who carry human excreta on the head, Shri Solanki reiterated.  Use of sustainable technologies to implement any solid and liquid waste management projects in rural areas need be analyzed in terms of social, environmental and economic terms. In case of waste water treatment in rural areas, suitable technologies are required to make the system self sustainable. Techno- entrepreneurs and NGOs are required to come up with technologies for rural areas having direct economic return from waste water treatment and solid waste management.

Required impact of sanitation and waste management can be achieved through social mobilizations supported by socio-culturally acceptable and economically affordable technology. Minister of Drinking Water and Sanitation Shri Solanki asked NGOs to help governments to improve environmental sanitation and liberation of scavengers from inhuman practice of cleaning and carrying the night soil.

Source : http://www.internationalnewsandviews.com/sanitary-household-toilet-is-the-most-important-aspect-of-sanitation-bharatsinh-solanki/

Posted by & filed under Articles, Delhi, Sulabh News.

 

Meira Kumar, Speaker, Lok Sabha, lighted the lamp to inaugurate the National Conference on Sociology of Sanitation (Environmental Sanitation, Public health and Social Deprivation), in New Delhi on Monday. Union Minister for Rural Development, Drinking Water and Sanitation, Jairam Ramesh and the Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Drinking Water and Sanitation, Bharatsinh Madhavsinh Solanki were also present during the event.

Source : http://www.newstrackindia.com/photogallery/images/view/5116-Meira-Kumar-inaugurates-National-Conference-on-Sociology-of-Sanitation.html

Posted by & filed under Articles, Delhi, In the Press.

 

Shri Bharatsinh Solanki Says Provision of Adequate Sanitation Coverage in Rural India Still Remains a Major Challenge 
We Need To Educate People to Improve Sanitation, Health and Environment to Help Liberate Scavenging System from the Country 

 

The Minister of State (Independent Charge) Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation Shri Bharatsinh Solanki addressing the Workshop on Sociology of Sanitation- Environmental Sanitation, Public Health and Deprivation, in New Delhi today, emphasised the need of educating various sections of the people to improve sanitation, health, environment and to help liberate scavenging system from the country. 

He said, ‘The availability of safe sanitation system is one of the important factors to gauge socio-economic and cultural development of any country. Safe disposal of human wastes has been a matter of concern since early civilization in different parts of the world. In Vedas it has been made very clear that driving away diseases and building human strength is definitely not possible without proper sanitation and adoption of hygienic rules.’ However, today major part of population of this region lack basic sanitation facility and opts for defecation in open. 

Shri Bharatsinh Solanki said that sanitary household toilet is the most important aspect of sanitation. The total economic impact of inadequate sanitation in India is estimated to be Rs 2.44 trillion a year which is equivalent to 6.4 per cent of India’s GDP in 2006, according to a study by the World Bank. 

It is an accepted fact that poor pay more directly and indirectly due to bad sanitation. Most of them who earn on daily wages lose out in case of illness due to bad sanitation. Further, other members of the family who look after the sick member also lose their daily earnings or schooling (in the case of children). 

Shri Solanki said, Open defecation has been a deep-rooted age old socially inherited behaviour in rural India. Provision of adequate sanitation coverage in rural India still remains a major challenge despite rising incomes and advent of new and more cost effective technologies, due to various mindsets. India a recognised leader in information technology and nuclear science still has a substantive proportion of the rural poor still defecate in the open, rather than investing on sanitary toilets. This may be because sanitation is neither a felt need nor is open defecation a socio-cultural taboo. Investing on a toilet is not a priority as of now for many of them. he said, well over 600 million Indians continue to lack access to even the most basic of sanitation facilities forcing them to defecate in the open. 

There is a considerable gap between access and use of toilet in rural areas. This could be due to various reasons like lack of proper privacy-providing super structure, lack of proper design, lack of maintenance or lack of required awareness to use toilets. Many of such toilets have been found actually dysfunctional. Many toilets have been reported to be used as store houses for dry cow dung cakes or for other purposes. Due to such reasons, there is considerable gap between the number of toilets constructed and those in actual use. To minimize such gaps, and ensure proper use of toilets, awareness is required for which the role of NGOs is crucial. As late Prime Minister Mrs. Indira Gandhi once said – Sanitation in India is not only cleanliness, it is also an end of the humiliation and miseries of scavengers who carry human excreta on the head, Shri Solanki reiterated. 

Use of sustainable technologies to implement any solid and liquid waste management projects in rural areas need be analyzed in terms of social, environmental and economic terms. In case of waste water treatment in rural areas, suitable technologies are required to make the system self sustainable. Techno- entrepreneurs and NGOs are required to come up with technologies for rural areas having direct economic return from waste water treatment and solid waste management. 

Required impact of sanitation and waste management can be achieved through social mobilizations supported by socio-culturally acceptable and economically affordable technology. Minister of Drinking Water and Sanitation Shri Solanki asked NGOs to help governments to improve environmental sanitation and liberation of scavengers from inhuman practice of cleaning and carrying the night soil.

Source : http://pib.nic.in/newsite/erelease.aspx?relid=91861

 

Posted by & filed under Articles, Delhi, In the Press.

 

New Delhi: Terming manual scavenging as “despicable”, Lok Sabha Speaker Meira Kumar on Monday called on society to cleanse its mindset to get rid of such practices.

“The caste system and untouchability in the country has given rise to such practices. Unless the society cleanses its mind of all the ills, no amount of effort can rid us of such practices,” she said.

Inaugurating a two-day seminar organised by Sulabh International Social Service Organisation, the speaker said: “Parliament should also rise to the occasion to meet the expectations of the nation and the house should be allowed to function to conduct its business.”

Early passage of the bill prohibiting employment of manual scavengers and their rehabilitation is necessary, stressed union Rural Development Minister Jairam Ramesh.

“I urge parliament to support the Prohibition of Employment as Manual Scavengers and their Rehabilitation Bill. If we resolve, we can pass this bill in two to three months.

“Unless these liberated scavengers are given alternative jobs, the purpose of the exercise would be defeated. They have to be given proper employment after imparting them some vocational training,” said Ramesh.

According to the bill, the district magistrate has to ensure that no person within his jurisdiction is engaged as a manual scavenger or constructs an insanitary latrine and manual scavengers are rehabilitated.

It makes it mandatory for municipalities, cantonment boards and railway authorities to construct adequate number of sanitary community latrines within three years of the act coming into force.

If anyone employs a manual scavenger or constructs an insanitary latrine, he shall be penalised with imprisonment up to one year or a fine of up to Rs 50,000 or both.

Sulabh founder Bindeshwar Pathak pitched for including sanitation in the study of sociology.

“The inclusion of this subject as one of the disciplines will not only enlarge the scope of sociology but will also be helpful in solving the problems of society in relation to sanitation, social deprivation, water, public health, hygiene, poverty, gender equality, welfare of the children and empowering knowledge for sustainable development,” he said.

So far, Sulabh has converted 1.3 million bucket toilets into flush toilets, and also has constructed more than 8,000 public toilets at important places all over the country which are being used by more than 15 million people everyday.

IANS

Source : http://www.firstpost.com/india/manual-scavenging-a-result-of-caste-system-speaker-meira-kumar-604969.html

Posted by & filed under Articles, Delhi, In the Press.

Lok Sabha Speaker Meira Kumar on Monday voiced fear that people could take to the streets if Parliament fails to address the issue of social inequality and prejudices.

"If Parliament does not fulfill this responsibility duly, then public revolutions will take place on roads and possibility of bloodshed cannot be denied," she said.

The Speaker made her observations at a national workshop organised by Sulabh International Centre on 'sociology in sanitation'.

She said only Parliament will have to fulfill the responsibility of addressing problems of social inequalities and wrong traditions.

"Parliament should function uninterrupted and keep fulfilling its responsibility of making legislations," she said while appealing all political parties to extend their support towards this end.

Describing manual scavenging as "despicable", the Speaker hoped that a Bill pending in Parliament to prohibit this practice will be passed with the support of all parties.

She lamented that caste system and untouchability in the county have given rise to such a practice.

"Unless the society cleanses its mind of all the ills, no amount of effort can get rid of such practices," she said.

Rural Development Minister Jairam Ramesh urged the Parliamentarians to support the Prohibition of Employment as Manual Scavengers and their Rehabilitation Bill, saying "if we resolve, we can pass this bill in two three months".

Ramesh, on the occasion, administrated oath to a least a dozen priests and scholars from Varanasi that they will not deny 'pooja' rights to people belonging to SC and ST and other backward castes.

They also took the pledge of working towards building an equalitarian society by helping people of lower strata to enter temples and have food with them.

"This social contact will help eradicate untouchability from the society," said Sulabh's founder Bindeshwar Pathak.

Source : http://www.hindustantimes.com/India-news/NewDelhi/Public-revolution-possible-if-Parliament-doesn-t-fulfill-duty-Meira-Kumar/Article1-1003026.aspx

 

 

Posted by & filed under Articles, In the Press, India.

Gosh! Its been nearly four months since I  last updated my blog, that's suicidal. Am back in the beautiful land of India and home to the Dr Bindershwar Pathak and his sanitation movement that has and continues to make headlines in India and countries afar. I will be here for three weeks and be sure that I will be constantly updating you on what's going.

Today is Republic Day in India and I had the immense pleasure of taking part in the celebrations that were organised by Sulabh and they involved the hoisting of the flag, the taking of an oath of allegiance by students of Sulabh Public School, speeches from the Founder and yours truly as well as a very exciting cultural programme that included a Vandemataram dance, by students of Sulabh literacy mission, a patriotic song – We are children of India, a presentation by the New Princesses of Alwar and Tonk (former human scavengers), a Chandalika short play and a street play. In a nutshell, my morning was very well spent. 

Allow me to quote from a book entitled India Express by Daniel Lak, 'Now that Ghandi is long gone, it falls on a remarkable organisation called Sulabh International to agitate for reform. In Sanskrit, a local language in India, Sulabh, is the word for 'easy'. The name of the organisation and the thinking behind it, are the work of its founder, Dr Bindershwar Pathak. Pathak is an upright, handsome man in this sixties who looks far younger. Its that easy, he repeats, many times during our conversation. His goal is nothing less than safe, hygienic sanitation for all of India's billion plus population and liberation for the remaining 250,000 sweepers."

Source : http://washfair.blogspot.in/2013/01/sulabh-foundation-celebrates-republic.html

Posted by & filed under Articles, Delhi, In the Press.

 

New Delhi, Jan 26 (IANS) A two-day national seminar to draw the road map for future strategy about sanitation in the country will kick start here Monday, the organisers said. It will delve into complex social and environmental issues.

The seminar, organised by Sulabh International Social Service Organisation will be held Jan 28-29 at Mavalankar Hall in Rafi Marg in central Delhi, will add to the corpus of knowledge and research on 'sociology of sanitation'.

Lok Sabha Speaker Meira Kumar will inaugurate the function while Rural Development Minister Jairam Ramesh will deliver the presidential address on the occasion, said an organisation member Saturday.

The academia, administrators, technocrats and people from civil society would be the other participants in the event.

They will conceptualise the complex social and environmental issues, and undertake an incisive perspective on futuristic goals, said the member.

The organisation has been working in the field of sanitation, environmental sanitation, public health, and liberation and rehabilitation of scavengers. It is also pioneering work for the empowerment and upliftment of the most downtrodden section of the society.

Source : http://www.newstrackindia.com/newsdetails/2013/01/26/292–Delhi-to-host-seminar-on-sociology-of-sanitation-.html

Posted by & filed under Africa, Articles, In the Press.

 

Co-Chadema Secretary General, Mama Josephine's Mushumbusi tofafanua topic in ongoing training in New Delhi, India.

Mama Josephine Mushumbusi , whose commitment, scored a trip to India, where he found some which ingewafaa Tanzanian education. He was not selfish, he did not call his relatives instead went Singida, Tunduma, Ubungo, Bunju and Mwanjelwa, he gathered several Tanzanians and buy them a plane ticket and bring the College called Sulabh International Organization for learning Sanitation.

Here

Source : http://arusha255.blogspot.in/2013/01/taswira-mama-josephine-mushumbusi-na.html

Posted by & filed under Articles, India, Sulabh News.

The story is about the origin of untouchability in India which started during the Vedic period. This social discrimination continued during the Buddha, Mauryan, Mughal and British period. Though, the untouchables did good things for the society like cleaning the human faeces of others to protect their health and environment, but the society in lieu thereof, humiliated, insulted and discriminated against them. The lives of untouchables were lower than the animals, and they had to face all sorts of drudgery and discrimination at the hands of the society.

Mahatma Gandhi was the first person, whose attention was drawn towards the plight of the scavengers, and he in his own way tried to restore human rights and dignity of untouchables to bring them on a par with others.
In 1968, Dr. Bindeshwar Pathak, a sociologist and social reformer came on the scene. He invented the technology of Sulabh Shauchalaya during Gandhi Centenary Celebration period, and this Sulabh Shauchalaya became a tool of social change. The scavengers got liberated from the demeaning and health hazardous practice of cleaning human excreta. After being liberated, they were given education, vocational training like making pappadam, noodles, pickles, stitching, tailoring, embroidery, as well as facial and beauty parlour training etc. so that they could earn their livelihood. The scavengers from Alwar & Tonk from Rajasthan, were helped to perform all the rites, rituals and ceremonies of upper class people to come on a par with them. These liberated scavengers were also taken for an audience with former Presidents of India, Hon’ble Shri R. Venkataraman, Hon’ble Shri Shankar Dayal Sharma and Hon’ble Smt. Pratibha Devisingh Patil, the then Prime Minister of India, Hon’ble Shri Rajiv Gandhi, Hon’ble Smt. Sonia Gandhi, Member of Parliament and Chairperson, United Progressive Alliance (UPA), Hon’ble Smt. Meira Kumar, Speaker, Lok Sabha, Hon’ble Shri Rahul Gandhi, Member of Parliament and Vice-President, Indian National Congress Party and others. They also went to the United Nations to attend the Conference in the General Assembly, where they walked the ramp in front of the dignitaries from all over the world. They went to visit the Statue of Liberty to declare they were no longer untouchables. Finally, they went to Durban, to see the Phoenix Ashram of Mahatma Gandhi, where he lived and started the movement and said, “Oh Bapu, because of you we are free from 5000 years of bondage and shackles of untouchability and social discrimination”. So in this way, their human rights and dignity have been restored, and they are living like upper caste people, and thus the dream of Mahatma Gandhi has been fulfilled. So this is the story of untouchables depicted in the play “Dream of Mahatma Gandhi: Serfdom to Freedom”,  which is going to be performed during the Cultural Programme of the “SOCIOLOGY OF SANITATION” Conference.